Workshops in the Museum

Presented by the Mackinac Arts Council. Join local and regional artists as they share their art expertise. Workshops take place in Marquette Park on the lawn outside The Richard and Jane Manoogian Mackinac Art Museum. Supplies are provided, but you may also bring your own. Class sizes are limited – early registration is recommended through the Mackinac Arts Council.

All workshops cost $20 per day unless otherwise noted. Discounts are available for students and Mackinac Island summer employees. Workshops are held after regular museum hours.

Workshop Schedule:

June 9 – Watercolor Lilacs
June 22 – Beginner Knitting with Becki Barnwell and Mary Patay (four week course – June 22, June 29, July 6, July 13)
June 23 – Island Instagram with Sara Wright
June 29 – Beginner Knitting with Becki Barnwell and Mary Patay – Course 2
June 30 – Plein Air Painting with Maeve Croghan
July 6 – Beginner Knitting with Becki Barnwell and Mary Patay – Course 3
July 7 – Felting with Kim Clare
July 13 – Beginner Knitting with Becki Barnwell and Mary Patay – Course 4
July 14 – Plein Air Painting with Scott Kenyon
July 21 – Island Instagram with Sara Wright
August 3 – Printmaking with Cindy Hunter Morgan
August 4 – Japanese Stab Binding
August 10 – Theatre Techniques with Starling Shakespeare Co.
August 11 – Rug Punch with Kim Clare
August 18 – Watercolors with Megan Swoyer
August 24 – Theatre Techniques with Starline Shakespeare Co.
August 25 – Plein Air Painting with Maeve Croghan

Workshops in the Museum

Presented by the Mackinac Arts Council. Join local and regional artists as they share their art expertise. Workshops take place in Marquette Park on the lawn outside The Richard and Jane Manoogian Mackinac Art Museum. Supplies are provided, but you may also bring your own. Class sizes are limited – early registration is recommended through the Mackinac Arts Council.

All workshops cost $20 per day unless otherwise noted. Discounts are available for students and Mackinac Island summer employees. Workshops are held after regular museum hours.

Workshop Schedule:

June 9 – Watercolor Lilacs
June 22 – Beginner Knitting with Becki Barnwell and Mary Patay (four week course – June 22, June 29, July 6, July 13)
June 23 – Island Instagram with Sara Wright
June 29 – Beginner Knitting with Becki Barnwell and Mary Patay – Course 2
June 30 – Plein Air Painting with Maeve Croghan
July 6 – Beginner Knitting with Becki Barnwell and Mary Patay – Course 3
July 7 – Felting with Kim Clare
July 13 – Beginner Knitting with Becki Barnwell and Mary Patay – Course 4
July 14 – Plein Air Painting with Scott Kenyon
July 21 – Island Instagram with Sara Wright
August 3 – Printmaking with Cindy Hunter Morgan
August 4 – Japanese Stab Binding
August 10 – Theatre Techniques with Starling Shakespeare Co.
August 11 – Rug Punch with Kim Clare
August 18 – Watercolors with Megan Swoyer
August 24 – Theatre Techniques with Starline Shakespeare Co.
August 25 – Plein Air Painting with Maeve Croghan

Full Moon Over Mackinac

Experience Mackinac Island by moonlight on this free guided hike with Park Naturalist Kyle Bagnall. Participants will meet at the Avenue of Flags behind Fort Mackinac and we’ll wander towards the highest point on Mackinac Island at Fort Holmes. Along the way, you’ll learn about local wildlife that emerges at dusk, including snowshoe hare, owls, and bats flying overhead. We’ll arrive at Fort Holmes in time to watch the full Sturgeon Moon rise over the Straits of Mackinac, illuminating the water below. #thisismackinac

Mackinac – Our Famous Island

The Mackinac Arts Council presents Mackinac – Our Famous Island in the Center for the Arts at Mission Point every Sunday May 2 – October 24. Admission is free. #thisismackinac

About the documentary: Detroit Public TV and Mackinac State Historic Parks takes viewers to Mackinac – Our Famous Island along its many shores and trails to experience the natural beauty of the island, visit landmarks that reveal its earliest history and introduce the people who still work to preserve this special place. There is far more to this sacred island than horses and fudge, and DPTV cameras capture the landscape and beauty while connecting us to the diverse communities and people who have been stewards of Mackinac Island throughout its history.

Mackinac Island Shakespeare Festival

The first ever Mackinac Island Shakespeare Festival will be held in Marquette Park throughout the month of August. Two classic Shakespeare plays will be presented – with a twist! The festival will feature Romeo and Juliet and Much Ado About Nothing, but both shows will be done with only five actors. All performances are presented by the Starling Shakespeare Co. and are free.

Mackinac Island Shakespeare Festival

The first ever Mackinac Island Shakespeare Festival will be held in Marquette Park throughout the month of August. Two classic Shakespeare plays will be presented – with a twist! The festival will feature Romeo and Juliet and Much Ado About Nothing, but both shows will be done with only five actors. All performances are presented by the Starling Shakespeare Co. and are free.

Mackinac Island Shakespeare Festival

The first ever Mackinac Island Shakespeare Festival will be held in Marquette Park throughout the month of August. Two classic Shakespeare plays will be presented – with a twist! The festival will feature Romeo and Juliet and Much Ado About Nothing, but both shows will be done with only five actors. All performances are presented by the Starling Shakespeare Co. and are free.

Where’s the Rum? Liquor and Soldiers at Michilimackinac

  A common question we hear at Michilimackinac concerns liquor being dispensed to soldiers. Pirate movies and other popular culture seem to suggest that every soldier in the 18th century received a regular issue of rum. The truth is a bit more complicated- liquor was issued and available to British soldiers at Michilimackinac, but only in specific circumstances.

  In many places where British troops were stationed, liquor was at least supposed to be issued to soldiers on a regular basis. When the Mutiny Act, which governed a variety of army administrative functions, was extended to cover the American colonies in 1765, it required every soldier to receive a daily allotment of beer, cider, or rum. These articles were to be provided by the government of whichever colony was quartering the soldiers. However, due to highly technical legal differences enshrined in British law, only soldiers quartered in private inns were allowed beer or rum. In British Canada, including Michilimackinac, soldiers were usually quartered in purpose-built barracks owned by the Crown, and as such were not entitled to a liquor ration. Rum and other liquors were never listed with provisions supplied to Michilimackinac and other Great Lakes posts, and soldiers could not expect a daily drink as part of their regular rations.

  Even though rum was not regularly issued, soldiers had access to liquor and other drinks through a variety of official and informal channels. Soldiers performing heavy labor, such as construction work or serving as boatmen, might be issued a special ration of rum in return for their extra exertions. In 1780, while his soldiers were heavily engaging in constructing a new fort on Mackinac Island, Lieutenant Governor Patrick Sinclair complained that the work was being held up “for want of working Cattle, Tools, the materials and Rum.” Soldiers could also be offered rum as a form of compensation. Earlier in the summer of 1780, a portion of the Michilimackinac garrison complained that they had not received their pay since August 1779. In lieu of money, Lt. George Clowes offered tobacco or rum, which the soldiers rejected. Of course, soldiers were also usually able to simply purchase liquor and other drinks on their own, using personal funds saved up from their wages. Rum and brandy arrived at Michilimackinac in huge quantities (2,155 kegs in 1778 alone) and were popular and important trade items, so they were readily available for purchase from the many civilian merchants operating at the post.

  Although soldiers may not have received official rum rations, Great Lakes sailors were another matter. Civilian sailors, such as those employed by John Askin in 1778, enjoyed a gill (one fourth of a pint, or four ounces) of rum a day, although Askin dictated that Pompey, an enslaved sailor, only receive half a gill. Sailors in government service also apparently received a regular rum ration. In 1783 a rum shortage caused considerable unrest among the British sailors working on the Great Lakes. At Detroit, Lieutenant Colonel Arent DePeyster complained that “we have not one drop of Rum in store here, the Naval Department begin to cry out.” General Allan MacLean, writing from Niagara, warned that “the seamen must have it [rum] for it’s part of their wages, and they will desert or mutiny if they do not get it.” To stave off desertions, MacLean ordered a small quantity of rum distributed from Niagara’s stores, but wrote to his superiors that it was almost impossible to replenish the garrison’s stocks of liquor. He declared that “I have more Plague with Rum than all the Business I have to do” and believed that “it’s a Pity that such a cursed Liquor ever had been found out.”

  While rum isn’t issued to our historical interpreters today, it was clearly an important item at Michilimackinac historically (especially for sailors). If you would like to learn more about trade on the Great Lakes, the British military at Michilimackinac, or the role of liquor in the fur trade, come visit us at Colonial Michilimackinac. Check out our website for tickets and more information.

 

Music in the Park, Presented by Mackinac Arts Council

From the Arts Council: “With a spectacular backdrop, our summer concert series takes place on the lawn of a National Historic Landmark, Marquette Park, which is at the foothills of Historic Fort Mackinac downtown across from the marina. Bring a picnic and tune in for some great live folk, rock, country, blues—the best of Americana. All concerts are free. We recommend bringing a blanket or lawn chairs for your comfort.”

Schedule of artists:
July 1 – Mackinac’s Got Talent!
July 8 – Olivia Dear
July 15 – Rachel Davis (with Chimney Rock)
July 22 – The Pistil Whips
July 29 – The Accidentals (with Gabi June)
August 5 – E Minor
August 12 – The Ark Band
August 19 – Mackinac’s Got Talent! Finals
August 26 – Kari Lynch
September 2 – Gin, Chocolate & Bottle Rockets

Artist-in-Residence Workshop with Woodcut Artist and Printmaker Benjamin Bohnsack

Woodcut artist and printmaker Benjamin Bohnsack will present a continuous demonstration of block printing during his residency, so keep an eye open for him while on the island! For his scheduled workshop, he will showcase a half hour presentation about the story of literacy and printing, with a visual description of what he does to create his art. He’ll also do a brief show and tell of the work he’s done while on the island, leaving time for questions at the end.

This program will be presented in the Station 256 Conference Room, located above the Mackinac Island State Park Visitor’s Center. Entrance is located at the rear of the building. Admission is free. #thisismackinac