British Landing Nature Programs – Scat Identification

Learn how to identify different scat left by various animals in Michigan. Learn how to figure out what the animal ate last. Do you know the difference between buck and doe scat? You will!

Program will take place at the podium and bench area adjacent to the south side of the British Landing Nature.Seating is first come first serve (you don’t have to be sitting in order to enjoy the program). The program will be about 15 minutes. This is a free Mackinac Parks: 125 event!

The program will be lead by ranger Emily Kimmel, a recent graduate from Lake Superior State University with a degrees in Parks and Recreation and Natural Resource Technologies. She is in her first season serving as the Naturalist for Mackinac State Historic Parks on Mackinac Island.

British Landing Nature Programs – Scat Identification

Learn how to identify different scat left by various animals in Michigan. Learn how to figure out what the animal ate last. Do you know the difference between buck and doe scat? You will!

Program will take place at the podium and bench area adjacent to the south side of the British Landing Nature.Seating is first come first serve (you don’t have to be sitting in order to enjoy the program). The program will be about 15 minutes. This is a free Mackinac Parks: 125 event!

The program will be lead by ranger Emily Kimmel, a recent graduate from Lake Superior State University with a degrees in Parks and Recreation and Natural Resource Technologies. She is in her first season serving as the Naturalist for Mackinac State Historic Parks on Mackinac Island.

British Landing Nature Programs – Scat Identification

Learn how to identify different scat left by various animals in Michigan. Learn how to figure out what the animal ate last. Do you know the difference between buck and doe scat? You will!

Program will take place at the podium and bench area adjacent to the south side of the British Landing Nature.Seating is first come first serve (you don’t have to be sitting in order to enjoy the program). The program will be about 15 minutes. This is a free Mackinac Parks: 125 event!

The program will be lead by ranger Emily Kimmel, a recent graduate from Lake Superior State University with a degrees in Parks and Recreation and Natural Resource Technologies. She is in her first season serving as the Naturalist for Mackinac State Historic Parks on Mackinac Island.

British Landing Nature Programs – Scat Identification

Learn how to identify different scat left by various animals in Michigan. Learn how to figure out what the animal ate last. Do you know the difference between buck and doe scat? You will!

Program will take place at the podium and bench area adjacent to the south side of the British Landing Nature.Seating is first come first serve (you don’t have to be sitting in order to enjoy the program). The program will be about 15 minutes. This is a free Mackinac Parks: 125 event!

The program will be lead by ranger Emily Kimmel, a recent graduate from Lake Superior State University with a degrees in Parks and Recreation and Natural Resource Technologies. She is in her first season serving as the Naturalist for Mackinac State Historic Parks on Mackinac Island.

Battlefield Archaeology at Wawashkamo Golf Club

Sideplate fragments and ramrod pipes from Wawashkamo battlefield survey. Credit: CHMA

One of the most unusual archaeological projects to take place on Mackinac Island was a metal detector survey of the portion of the 1814 battlefield located on Wawashkamo Golf Club. The project was carried out in May 2002 by the Heidelberg (Ohio) College Center for Historic and Military Archaeology under the direction of Dr. Michael Pratt and funded by the Wawashkamo Restoration and Preservation Fund.

1814 Battle of Mackinac Island.

The August 4, 1814 battle was always known to have taken place on the Dousman farm on either side of what is now known as British Landing Road. This survey was designed to determine what might be left in the ground on the western side of the battlefield after 85 years of farming by the Dousman and Early families, followed by 102 years as a golf course.
Three different types of metal detection instruments were used in order to locate ferrous, brass, copper, silver, lead, nickel and gold artifacts. The fairways were systematically “swept” to locate possible concentrations of artifacts. Four areas of interest were located, which were then intensively surveyed.
Two hundred sixty-five artifacts related to the battle were located. These included United States Infantry and Artillery buttons, spent and dropped rifle, musket and buck shot, a piece of iron canister shot, trade gun parts, an 1807 U.S penny, and three nearly complete clasp knives. Additional artifacts recovered related to the Dousman and Early farms and all eras of Wawashkamo Golf Club.

U.S. Army buttons recovered during Wawashkamo battlefield survey. Credit: CHMA

The clusters were located on fairways 1, 5, and 9 and the east end of fairway 8. Spatial analysis of the battlefield artifacts indicated that the survey area included the path of Lieutenant Colonel George Croghan’s regular troops advancing and retreating along British Landing Road, and the possible location of Major Andrew Holmes’s unsuccessful flanking attack and death.
The 2002 survey demonstrated that significant archaeological resources have survived at Wawashkamo. The results did not re-write the story of the battle, rather they fleshed out the written record and provided a tangible link to the only battle ever fought on Mackinac Island.

On This Day: Battle of Mackinac Island, August 4, 1814

American soldiers from the 17th, 19th, and 24th Infantry Regiments joined men from the Corps of Artillery, the Marine Corps, and the Ohio militia during the battle.

On August 4, 1814, war came to Mackinac Island. The island, which had been captured by the British in 1812, was now the focus of an American campaign to reclaim the region. That campaign reached its zenith as hundreds of American troops landed on the island’s north shore, marched inland, and encountered well-entrenched British, Canadian, and Native American troops. (more…)