Today’s Events at Colonial Michilimackinac

Today’s Events at Colonial Michilimackinac

October 13 – October 23, 2022 (Thursday-Sunday ONLY)

11:00 a.m.
Colonial Michilimackinac Open for the Day
11:30 a.m.
Artillery Firing Demonstration
12:00 p.m.
The Pleasures of the Table: Dining Culture at the Merchant’s House Program
12:30 p.m.
Musket Firing Demonstration
1:00 p.m.
Michilimackinac’s Enslaved Community Program
2:00 p.m.
War in the West: Michilimackinac 1779 Program
3:00 p.m.
Artillery Firing Demonstration
3:30 p.m.
Musket Firing Demonstration
4:00 p.m.
Colonial Michilimackinac Closed for the Day

A downloadable version of the events schedule can be found here: October 13 – October 23, 2022

Today’s Events at Colonial Michilimackinac

Today’s Events at Colonial Michilimackinac

June 4 – September 4, 2022

9:00 a.m.
Colonial Michilimackinac Open for the Day
9:30 a.m.
Musket Firing Demonstration
10:00 a.m.
Unpack a Trade Bale Program
10:30 a.m.
Artillery Firing Demonstration
11:00 a.m.
War in the West: Michilimackinac 1779 Program
12:00 p.m.
The Pleasures of the Table: Dining Culture at the Merchant’s House Program
12:30 p.m.
Musket Firing Demonstration
1:00 p.m.
Michilimackinac’s Enslaved Community Program
2:00 p.m.
Women at Michilimackinac Program
3:00 p.m.
Artillery Firing Demonstration
3:30 p.m.
Gardens of Michilimackinac Program
4:30 p.m.
Some Tea and Loaf Sugar: Tea at the British Trader’s House
5:30 p.m.
People of the Fur Trade Program
6:00 p.m.
Regulars on the Frontier: Barracks Life Program
6:30 p.m.
Musket Firing Demonstration
7:00 p.m.
Colonial Michilimackinac Closed for the Day

A downloadable version of the events schedule can be found here: June 4 – September 4, 2022

Today’s Events at Colonial Michilimackinac

Today’s Events at Colonial Michilimackinac

September 5 – October 7, 2022

9:00 a.m.
Colonial Michilimackinac Open for the Day
9:30 a.m.
Musket Firing Demonstration
10:00 a.m.
People of the Fur Trade Program
10:30 a.m.
Artillery Firing Demonstration
11:00 a.m.
War in the West: Michilimackinac 1779 Program
12:00 p.m.
The Pleasures of the Table: Dining Culture at the Merchant’s House Program
12:30 p.m.
Musket Firing Demonstration
1:00 p.m.
Michilimackinac’s Enslaved Community Program
2:00 p.m.
Women at Michilimackinac Program
3:00 p.m.
Artillery Firing Demonstration
3:30 p.m.
Gardens of Michilimackinac Program
4:30 p.m.
Musket Firing Demonstration
5:00 p.m.
Colonial Michilimackinac Closed for the Day

A downloadable version of the events schedule can be found here: September 5 – October 7

Today’s Events at Colonial Michilimackinac

Today’s Events at Colonial Michilimackinac

May 4 – June 3, 2022

9:00 a.m.
Colonial Michilimackinac Open for the Day
9:30 a.m.
Musket Firing Demonstration
10:00 a.m.
People of the Fur Trade Program
10:30 a.m.
Artillery Firing Demonstration
11:00 a.m.
War in the West: Michilimackinac 1779 Program
12:00 p.m.
The Pleasures of the Table: Dining Culture at the Merchant’s House Program
12:30 p.m.
Musket Firing Demonstration
1:00 p.m.
Michilimackinac’s Enslaved Community Program
2:00 p.m.
Women at Michilimackinac Program
3:00 p.m.
Artillery Firing Demonstration
3:30 p.m.
Gardens of Michilimackinac Program
4:30 p.m.
Musket Firing Demonstration
5:00 p.m.
Colonial Michilimackinac Closed for the Day

A downloadable version of the events schedule can be found here: May 4 – June 3, 2022

A Colonial Christmas

A Colonial Christmas

Colonial Michilimackinac
Mackinaw City

Saturday, December 10, 2022
3:00 – 7:00pm

Last admission at 6:30pm

Historic Interpreters getting ready to celebrate Christmas at MichilimackinacAdult – $10
Child (5-12) – $6
Free for children 4 and under and Mackinac Associates (excluding Heritage level)

The sun sets on the Straits of Mackinac. Fires crackle in stone hearths. The smell of treats and warm beverages fill the crisp winter air. Laughter, conversation, and more can be heard emanating from inside the palisaded walls. It’s ‘A Colonial Christmas’ at Colonial Michilimackinac, where the traditions of the 17th and 18th century are alive for all to explore. 

Lanterns light the path in Michilimackinac where storytellers recount the various traditions of historic residents, a retelling of the first Christmas at Mackinac in 1679, and the church at Ste. Anne’s prepared for Christmas Mass as it would have been in the 18th century. Create crafts to take home and bring the family out on the Parade Ground for historic games. All the while, enjoy delicious holiday snacks located throughout the fort.

Tickets are available here. 

 

 

 

 

 

Winter in Michgan’s North Woods: Amazing Animal Adaptations

Winter in Michgan’s North Woods: Amazing Animal Adaptations

Virtual Education Outreach

Target Audience: This program can be adapted to fit different age levels and grades.

Brand new for the 2021-22 school year! In order to survive winter, animals in the North Woods of Michigan adapt in many amazing ways. This interactive presentation will explore what plants and animals need to survive, the climate of our region, and why the seasons change. Using animal mounts, photos, and stories we’ll investigate the adaptations of animals such as owls, grouse, otters, fox, and beaver.

When is this program offered?
This program is available Thursdays at 9:30 a.m., January 6-April 7.

How much is this program? 
$20.00

How do I book a program?
Click here to book a program. After payment is received, a representative from Mackinac State Historic Parks will reach out to confirm your booking. This confirmation may take up to three days.

What education standards does this program meet?

*Allows for local, regional, or Michigan specific contexts or examples in teaching and assessment.

K – LS1-1    Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive.*
K – ESS2-2   Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs.
K – ESS3-1   Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants or animals (including humans) and the places they live
K – PS3-1    Make observations to determine the effect of sunlight on Earth’s surface.
2 – LS4-1    Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.*
3 – LS2-1    Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive
3 – LS4-3    Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.*
3 – LS4-4    Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.*
3 – LS3-2    Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment.
3 – LS4-2    Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
3 – ESS2-2 Obtain and combine information to describe climates in different regions of the world.
4-LS1-1       Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
5 – PS3-1    Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.
5 – LS2-1    Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
MS – LS2-1 Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.*
MS – LS2-4 Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations
MS – LS2-2 Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.*
MS – LS1-5 Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.*

 

 

Questions?
Please email outreach@mackinacparks.com. 

Fort Fright

Fort Fright

 

 

2016 Fort Fright Banner


Red DemonColonial Michilimackinac
Mackinaw City

Friday, October 7
6:30 – 9:30pm

Saturday, October 8
6:30 – 9:30pm

Last admission at 8:30pm both nights

Adult – $11
Child (5-12) – $7
Free for children 4 and under and Mackinac Associates (excluding Heritage level)

Tickets are available at the door!

Lanterns light your way through an 18th-century fort and fur trading village overrun by werewolves, witches, goblins and ghouls. Storytellers weave spooky folktales near bonfires and treats such as hot mulled cider, cookies and candy can be found throughout the site.

Most stops are suitable for all ages, but a haunted house, demon walk, and werewolf walk give thrills and chills to adults and children like.

Tickets are available at the Colonial Michilimackinac Visitor’s Center. Online ticket sales are done for this event. Fort Fright will happen rain or shine – tickets are non-refundable.

 Skeleton Soldiers and Block House

Current Archaeology at Colonial Michilimackinac

Current Archaeology at Colonial Michilimackinac

Archaeology at House E of the Southeast Rowhouse

Mackinac State Historic Parks’ archaeologists have been excavating the site of House E of the Southeast Rowhouse since 2007. This is the unit west of House D.

The Southeast Rowhouse was built in the 1730s. It was owned by Charles Gonneville, who traded at Michilimackinac from 1727 through 1754, and owned the house at least through 1758. By 1765 the house was in the hands of an English trader. The archaeology indicates he continued to occupy the house until it was demolished in 1781 when the community moved to Mackinac Island.

Our main research question when we began excavating was “How does a British trader’s house look different archaeologically from a French fur trader’s house?” While we still have several more seasons of work to do, we have some initial answers.

Click on the images to enlarge them.

Ceramics
One of the most striking things about the artifact assemblage from this house is the number and variety of ceramics present.

Tin-glazed earthenware, delft and faience, is typically the most common ceramic type found at Michilimackinac. We are finding it here, some of it in large, for us, sherds.

 

 

 

Likewise, we are finding quite a bit of Chinese export porcelain, some in recognizable vessel forms, such as this saucer.

 

 

 

Stoneware is another common ceramic type, but the stoneware sherds from this house include a sherd of rare Nottingham stoneware and a sherd of Rhenish stoneware imported all the way from Germany.

 

 

 

Creamware, invented by Josiah Wedgwood in the early 1760s is an excellent time-marker for the British period at Michilimackinac. Perhaps not surprisingly, we are finding quite a bit of it, including enough to reassemble this plate.

 

 

 

One of the most unusual ceramic types found during this project is polychrome creamware, first manufactured in 1775, just six years before the site was abandoned.

 

 

 

Trade silver
Trade silver has long been recognized as a hallmark of the British-era fur trade in North America, but has not been commonly found at Michilimackinac. This house has been an exception to that pattern.

The 2017 excavation produced the most trade silver in a single season.

 

 

 

 

Several of the thin circle brooches, like the one pictured to the left, have been found. This thicker circular brooch is unique.

 

 

 

Personal Adornment
One of the surprises at House E has been the large number of personal adornment items recovered. We had previously associated fancy dress with French-Canadians. This English trader followed fashion not just in his tableware, but in his clothing as well.

These are two fancy buttons from House E. The first is silver and gilt. The second was wrapped with metallic thread.

 

 

 

Fancy sleeve buttons, what we would call cufflinks today, could be easily switched between shirts and removed before laundering.

 

 

 

This shoe buckle is one of the more complete buckles found at the house.

 

 

 

 

This cameo bust brass ring is only the second of its kind to be found in over sixty seasons of excavation at the fort.

 

 

 

 

It may be hard to recognize, but this is the handle from a small dress sword. By the late 18th century, swords were primarily fashion accessories rather than weapons.

 

 

 

Gun Parts
Some of the differences between houses are in what is not present. Unlike most houses excavated to date at Michilimackinac, gun parts are uncommon finds at House E.

This serpentine sideplate from a British trade gun is one of only four gun parts recovered at House E through 2019.

 

 

 

 

Religious Artifacts
The Roman Catholic devotional artifacts found at House E are evidence of the earlier Gonneville residence of the house.

This rosary is notable as being the only intact rosary found at Michilimackinac. It consists of ivory beads connected by silver alloy links. It is made up of five complete decades plus an extra “decade” of nine beads. A Brigittine rosary consists of six decades, as do rosaries used by Discalced Carrmelites. Neither of these orders has a known presence at Michilimackinac.

 

 

This crucifix could have been on the end of a rosary or been worn alone.

 

 

 

 

These images show both sides of one of three religious medallions found at the house. The front depicts the head of Jesus, surrounded by the words “SALVATOR MVND” (Savior of the World). The reverse depicts the Virgin Mary surrounded by “MATER SALVATOR ORA PRO” (Mother of the Savior, pray for [us]).

 

 

Mystery-solved!
We frequently find fragments of objects that we cannot identify. Sometimes we are able to solve the mystery.

This is the artifact we found. It is brass, about the size of a quarter, but thicker.

 

 

 

 

Here it is next to an antique spyglass brought in by one of our interpreters. It was the eyepiece from a spyglass!

 

 

 

 

Several years later we found what appears to be the crushed tube from a spyglass. A similar tube was found in the French well and is on display in Treasures from the Sand.

The Revolutionary War in Michigan

The Revolutionary War in Michigan

Virtual Education Outreach

Target Audience: 5th Grade

People from Michigan played a critical role in the American Revolution. This program will allow students to explore their motivations for participating in the war, and will provide an overview of the numerous contributions of the Anishnaabek and other indigenous people made in shaping the outcome of the Revolution.

When is this program offered?
This program is available Wednesdays at 10:00 a.m., January 5-April 6 via Zoom.

How much is this program? 
$20.00

How do I book a program?
Click here to book a program. After payment is received, a representative from Mackinac State Historic Parks will reach out to confirm your booking. This confirmation may take up to three days.

What education standards does this program meet?
This program is aimed at students in fifth grade.

5 – U3.1.1 Describe how the French and Indian War affected British policy toward the colonies and subsequent colonial dissatisfaction with the new policy.
5 – U3.2.1 Describe the advantages and disadvantages each side had during the American Revolution with respect to military leadership, geography, types of resources, and motivations.
5 – U3.2.3 Investigate the role of women, enslaved and freed Africans, Indigenous Peoples, and France in helping shape the outcome of the war.

Questions?
Please email outreach@mackinacparks.com. 

Women at Michilimackinac

Women at Michilimackinac

Virtual Education Outreach

Target Audience: 5th Grade

Women at Michilimackinac were not bystanders to the 18th century fur-trading community. In this program students will be introduced to women from diverse backgrounds that all had an integral role in making the Straits of Mackinac a successful fortified trans-shipment point.

When is this program offered?
This program is offered every Monday and Friday at 1:00 p.m. from January 3 through April 8 via Zoom.

How much is this program? 
$20.00

How do I book a program?
Click here to book a program. After payment is received, a representative from Mackinac State Historic Parks will reach out to confirm your booking. This confirmation may take up to three days.

What education standards does this program meet?
This program is aimed at students in fifth grade.

5 – U2.3.3 Describe colonial life in America from the perspectives of at least three different groups of people.