American Fur Co. Store & Dr. Beaumont Museum Visitor Information

Travel Information

The American Fur Co. Store & Dr. Beaumont Museum is located on Mackinac Island within the boundaries of Mackinac Island State Park, on the corner of Fort and Market Streets.

Street Address

7232 Market Street
Mackinac Island, MI 49757

Travel Directions

Click here to map your route to the American Fur Co. Store & Dr. Beaumont Museum and for general travel information on your visit to Mackinac Island.

 

Visitor Services

Restrooms

There are no restrooms at the American Fur Co. Store & Dr. Beaumont Museum. The nearest restrooms are located at the Mackinac Island State Park Visitor’s Center, down Fort Street on Main Street.

Accessibility 

The American Fur Co. Store & Dr. Beaumont Museum warmly welcomes guests with special needs. Learn more about how guests with limited mobility or other special needs can fully enjoy their visit. Click here for complete information about accessibility. 

 

Visitation Tips & Courtesies

Getting Around

The American Fur Co. Store & Dr. Beaumont Museum is a small two-room house with two exhibits and live interpretation.

Touring Time

We recommend that you plan to spend a minimum of one half hour touring the site.

Pet Friendly

Well-behaved pets on leashes are welcome.

Photography

Photography is permitted and encouraged in all areas. Professional or group photography must be approved in advance.

Electronic Devices

Please silence electronic devices during audiovisual presentations and live demonstrations.

Smoking

The American Fur Co. Store & Dr. Beaumont Museum is a smoke-free site.

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Benjamin Blacksmith Shop Visitor Information

Benjamin Blacksmith Shop Visitor Information

Travel Information

Benjamin Blacksmith Shop is located on Mackinac Island within the boundaries of Mackinac Island State Park, on Market Street near the intersection of Astor Street.

Street Address

7406 Market Street
Mackinac Island, MI 49757

Travel Directions

Click here to map your route to the Benjamin Blacksmith Shop and for general travel information on your visit to Mackinac Island.

 

Visitor Services

Restrooms

There are no restrooms at the Benjamin Blacksmith Shop. The nearest restrooms are located behind the Mackinac Island Tourism Bureau information building, or at the Mackinac Island State Park Visitor’s Center.

Accessibility 

Benjamin Blacksmith Shop warmly welcomes guests with special needs. Learn more about how guests with limited mobility or other special needs can fully enjoy their visit. Click here for complete information about accessibility. 

 

Visitation Tips & Courtesies

Getting Around

The Benjamin Blacksmith Shop is a small shop featuring a working blacksmith, which includes some loud noises.

Touring Time

We recommend that you plan to spend a minimum of one half hour touring the site.

Pet Friendly

Well-behaved pets on leashes are welcome. A water bowl is located on the Biddle House grounds

Photography

Photography is permitted and encouraged in all areas. Professional or group photography must be approved in advance.

Electronic Devices

Please silence electronic devices during audiovisual presentations and live demonstrations.

Smoking

Benjamin Blacksmith Shop is a smoke-free site.

Buy Tickets

Benjamin Blacksmith Shop Hours & Admission

Benjamin Blacksmith Shop Hours & Admission

2022 Hours of Operation

June 4 – September 4, 2022
10:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
Last Admission 5:30 p.m.

September 5 – October 9, 2022
10:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Last Admission 4:00 p.m.

2022 Admission Rates

Adult $10.00
Child (Age 5-12) $6.50

Admission also includes the Biddle House, featuring the Mackinac Island Native American Museum and The Richard & Jane Manoogian Mackinac Art Museum. Admission to the Benjamin Blacksmith Shop is included with a Fort Mackinac ticket.

Click here for more information and to save on season passes.

Biddle House Visitor Information

Biddle House Visitor Information

Travel Information

The Biddle House is located on Mackinac Island within the boundaries of Mackinac Island State Park, on Market Street near the intersection of Astor Street.

Street Address

7406 Market Street
Mackinac Island, MI 49757

Travel Directions

Click here to map your route to the Biddle House and for general travel information on your visit to Mackinac Island.

 

Visitor Services

Restrooms

There are no restrooms at the Biddle House. The nearest restrooms are located behind the Mackinac Island Tourism Bureau information building, or at the Mackinac Island State Park Visitor’s Center.

Accessibility 

The Biddle House warmly welcomes guests with special needs. Learn more about how guests with limited mobility or other special needs can fully enjoy their visit. Click here for complete information about accessibility. 

 

Visitation Tips & Courtesies

Getting Around

Please keep in mind that the Biddle House is a historic building that features indoor and outdoor elements. We recommend walking shoes and comfortable clothing.

Touring Time

We recommend that you plan to spend a minimum of one hour touring the site.

Pet Friendly

Well-behaved pets on leashes are welcome. A water bowl is located adjacent to the front entrance.

Photography

Photography is permitted and encouraged in all areas. Professional or group photography must be approved in advance.

Electronic Devices

Please silence electronic devices during audiovisual presentations and live demonstrations.

Smoking

Biddle House is a smoke-free site.

Buy Tickets

Biddle House Hours & Admission

Biddle House Hours & Admission

2022 Hours of Operation

June 4 – September 4, 2022
10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Last Admission 5:30 p.m. 

September 5 – October 9, 2022
10:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Last Admission 4:00 p.m. 

2022 Admission Rates

Adult $10.00
Child (Age 5-12) $6.50

A Historic Downtown Mackinac ticket includes admission to The Richard and Jane Manoogian Mackinac Art Museum and Benjamin Blacksmith Shop (May 3 – October 9), as well as the American Fur Co. Store & Dr. Beaumont Museum and McGulpin House (June 4 – August 21). Admission to the Biddle House is also included with a Fort Mackinac ticket.

Click here for more information and to save on season passes.

Biddle House

Biddle House

A Time of Change. 

This is Mackinac. 

Step into the home of Agatha and Edward Biddle, merchants who moved in around 1830. This was a time of change, and the 1830s were critical to the Biddles for another reason: as an Anishnaabek woman, Agatha and other indigenous people witnessed their culture subjected to immense changes. The decade transformed the Anishnaabek, linking old ways with Michigan’s modern indigenous culture.

The continuing story of the Anishnaabek of northern Michigan is not always a happy one. It is a story of battles won and lost, promises made and broken, and cultures repressed and resurgent. Most importantly, the story in which the Biddle family played a role is one that continues today. This new exhibit, created in conjunction with tribal partners, explores that story and how it still resonates on Mackinac Island and throughout northern Michigan.

Highlights

Live Programs

Costumed interpreters will interpret the house as the 1830s home of Agatha and Edward Biddle. Exciting and informative cooking demonstrations will take place throughout the day in the kitchen, as well as interpretation of the Anishnaabek gallery located in the rest of the house. The following programs take place daily, May 3 – October 9:

1:00 p.m. A Time of Choice: The Treaty of Washington, 1836
This program offers visitors a brief overview of how the 1836 Treaty of Washington effected the Anishnaabek of northern Michigan, including Agatha Biddle. It is intended to complement the exhibit, offering more detail and context about the choices facing the Anishnaabek leading up to and during treaty negotiations, as well as the aftermath of its ratification.

3:30 p.m. Agatha, Magdelaine, and Elizabeth: In Business at Mackinac
This program offers visitors a brief overview of the lives of three Mackinac women: Agatha Biddle, Magdelaine Laframboise, and Elizabeth Mitchell. Although the focus of the new exhibits at the Biddle House, Agatha was by no means the only indigenous woman in business on Mackinac Island in the early 19th century. Instead, Agatha was part of a community of women who utilized their contacts in the Anishnaabek and Euro-American worlds to find success as merchants.

Exhibits

Two exhibit galleries inside the house, as well as a parlor restored to its historical appearance, tell the story of Agatha and Edward Biddle, the Anishnaabek of northern Michigan, and the critical decade of the 1830s. The story continues outside, with a short interpretive trail focusing on Anishnaabek culture and their relationship to Mackinac Island.