Biddle House

Market Street
Represents 1820s-era

Your Experience

Smell hearty stew simmering in a cast iron pot over the open hearth fireplace.  Card wool with carding paddles and spin it on a spinning wheel.  Watch knitting and quilting.  Immerse yourself in early 19th-century domestic crafts, and ask questions.  The costumed historic interpreters are ready to explain these crafts and more.  Period furnishings transform this “middle-class” reconstructed house to an era when Mackinac Island was the center of the fur trade.  The historic building also includes period settings and furnishings.

History

Built in the late 18th-century, the Biddle House was owned by the merchant class (present day “middle class”) Edward Biddle family for several generations.  Edward Biddle, from a prominent East coast family, was an American who took up permanent residence on Mackinac Island after the War of 1812.  He married Agatha, a local Odawa-Metis woman who lived all of her life in the region.  They purchased the house in 1832, although they may have lived there before this time.