Artillery at Fort Mackinac

Artillery at Fort Mackinac

Small bronze mortars, which fired explosive shells in a high arc, also made up part of Fort Mackinac’s early defenses.

Small bronze mortars, which fired explosive shells in a high arc, also made up part of Fort Mackinac’s early defenses.

Artillery pieces always played a vital role at Fort Mackinac. Although their functions changed over time, these weapons were an important feature of the garrison for every soldier who served at the post from 1779 to 1895. (more…)

Preserving Island Business History: Arnold Transit Company

Preserving Island Business History: Arnold Transit Company

George T. Arnold

George T. Arnold

For 138 years, the Arnold Transit Line ferried passengers to and from Mackinac Island. The company started out as the Mackinac Lumber Company. Founded by George T. Arnold and two business partners in 1878, it later became the Arnold and Coats Ferry Line. In 1890, Arnold bought out his competitors and incorporated the company. Thus, the Arnold Transit Line was born! Its fleet was a common sight near Mackinac Island into November 2016 when its assets were sold to Star Line Mackinac Island Ferry. (more…)

Historic Solar Events at the Straits: The Parhelion of 1671

Historic Solar Events at the Straits: The Parhelion of 1671

The solar eclipse which will take place on August 21 will be the first total eclipse of the sun visible across the entire United States in nearly 100 years. The path of the totality of the eclipse (the area where the moon will perfectly align with the sun, momentarily but completely blocking the view of the sun from the ground) will pass south of the Straits of Mackinac, but viewers in northern Michigan will still be able to see the moon block about 75% of the sun. (more…)

History of the Fort Mackinac Tea Room

History of the Fort Mackinac Tea Room

Patrons enjoying lunch with a view, ca. 1965. Note the colonial-style uniforms worn by the waitresses.

Patrons enjoying lunch with a view, ca. 1965. Note the colonial-style uniforms worn by the waitresses.

The Tea Room has been a memorable part of a visit to Fort Mackinac for decades. Located in the historic 1780 Officers’ Stone Quarters it provides a place of refreshment in a quaint atmosphere with the added bonus of the best view of any restaurant on the island.  (more…)

The Treaty of Greenville: August 3, 1795

The Treaty of Greenville: August 3, 1795

On August 3, 1795, the Revolutionary War on the western frontier finally ended with the signing of the Treaty of Greenville. This treaty signaled the end of British control of Mackinac Island, and heralded the American occupation of Michigan. Although the Treaty of Paris of 1783 formally ended the war between the American colonists and the British, the indigenous residents of what would become the United States had not been consulted. As a result, the Revolution evolved into the Northwest Indian War, fought between Americans pouring westward over the Appalachian Mountains and the plethora of indigenous nations known as the Western Confederacy. (more…)

WPA and Mackinac

WPA and Mackinac

The Works Progress Administration (WPA) was a New Deal work program established in 1935 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It provided skill-based jobs to unemployed Americans affected by the Great Depression. Through the WPA over 650,000 miles of roads, 75,000 bridges, and 8,000 parks were built. (more…)

1815: The Americans Return to Mackinac Island

1815: The Americans Return to Mackinac Island

On July 18, 1815, Mackinac Island once again became part of the United States after three years of British occupation during the War of 1812. The war brought many changes to the island, including the construction of a second fort on the heights of Mackinac. This weekend, this small post, Fort Holmes, will come to life to tell the story of Mackinac Island during the early years of peace.  IMG_3751 (more…)

Confederate Political Prisoners at Fort Mackinac

Confederate Political Prisoners at Fort Mackinac

Washington Barrow (1807-1866) Congressman, Newspaper editor, Attorney General of Tennessee

Washington Barrow (1807-1866)
Congressman, Newspaper editor, Attorney General of Tennessee

During the summer of 1862, Mackinac Island became the home to three men from Tennessee who refused to swear allegiance to the Union. In April, military Governor Andrew Johnson had the three men arrested for their support of the Confederacy and “treasonous inclinations.” Johnson felt that the wealthy, planter class of the South was part of the reason for the war and he wanted the three men removed from Tennessee. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton ordered the three men sent to Detroit until a decision could be made regarding their incarceration.

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