Winter Recreation on Victorian Mackinac Island

Winter Recreation on Victorian Mackinac Island

Most stores have closed, many hotels and cottages have been boarded up, and we have had the first snow of the season on Mackinac Island.  Winter on Victorian Mackinac Island was much like it is today – boats stopped running, winter provisions were stocked, and the smaller island population could be cut off the from mainland often. While ice breakers, the internet and planes keep present-day Mackinac Island more connected than ever before, what did island residents do in the past in the wintertime? (more…)

The Somewhere in Time Gazebo

The Somewhere in Time Gazebo

The gazebo decorated for a wedding around 2012.

Nestled along Anne’s Tablet Trail, you’ll find the Somewhere in Time Gazebo tucked away over-looking Haldimand Bay, Round Island, and Downtown Mackinac Island. Though the gazebo is stashed away in a secluded part of Mackinac Island, visitors from around the world stop to take in the beauty every day. Some come to witness a part of Hollywood history, others find the view inspiring, and many find it to be a romantic and picturesque wedding venue. (more…)

A Golf Legend Comes to Mackinac Island

A Golf Legend Comes to Mackinac Island

Wawashkamo Register dated June 29, 1919. Walter Hagen outlined in red box.

Wawashkamo Register dated June 29, 1919. Walter Hagen outlined in red box.

Wawashkamo Golf Club’s board of directors recently donated the club’s early Visitor’s Registers to Mackinac State Historic Parks. These leather-bound books, dating from 1900 and filled with the names and dates of golfers, provide a delightful glimpse into the history of the course and early 20th century Mackinac Island. Thumbing through the first volume, we were thrilled to discover that Walter Hagen, one of the game’s most successful and popular golfers in the first half of the 20th century, played the island course in the summer of 1919. (more…)

Ste. Anne de Michilimackinac

Ste. Anne de Michilimackinac

A recent wedding at the church.

A recent wedding at the church.

After the question is popped, the real fun begins- planning the wedding. One of the most exciting and challenging tasks is finding the perfect location for the memorable day. Outdoor or indoor venue? Intimate or spacious? In a busy city or tucked away on a quiet beach? The options are endless. Mackinac State Historic Parks offers ten historic wedding venues on Mackinac Island and in Mackinaw City. One of our truly unique historic wedding venues is the Ste. Anne de Michilimackinac church. Located in Colonial Michilimakinac, this reconstruction was built on the original location of the 18th-century church. (more…)

Outside the Walls: The “Subarbs” of Michilimackinac

Outside the Walls: The “Subarbs” of Michilimackinac

In the 18th century, the summer population of Michilimackinac could swell into the thousands as voyageurs, clerks, merchants, and other French-Canadian, British, and Native American participants in the fur trade descended on the post for the annual trading season. Given the relatively small size of the town inside the fort’s walls, where did all of these people live? By the 1760s, a growing collection of homes sprang up east of the fort, creating the suburbs of Michilimackinac.  (more…)

Fort Fright

Fort Fright

The autumn air is crisp and cool as you pass down the trail of lantern lights, the skeleton soldiers are waiting to welcome you to Colonial Michilimackinac. It’s time for Fort Fright.

A Werewolf watches as unsuspecting visitors enter Fort Fright.

This haven for lutins, werewolves and other bad-tempered creatures, the fort provides a fun, fall atmosphere for the entire family with it’s fair-share of scary experiences and historical background. (more…)

Obscure Places on Mackinac Island

Obscure Places on Mackinac Island

Every year, thousands of people come to Mackinac Island and visit such well-known places as Arch Rock, British Landing, Sugar Loaf, and Fort Mackinac. But have you ever visited Desha Mound, Langlade Craig, Echo Grotto, or Raymbault Height? These are just a few of the 212 named “places of interest” on the island listed by the Michigan Historical Commission in a 1916 travel bulletin. (more…)

Captain George Etherington: Michilimackinac’s Unfortunate Commander

Captain George Etherington: Michilimackinac’s Unfortunate Commander

Many visitors to the Straits of Mackinac are aware of the events of June 2, 1763, when a group of 400 Ojibwa men captured the British fort of Michilimackinac through a skillful surprise attack. The Ojibwa attack, which initially took the form of a seemingly-innocent game of baggatiway in honor of King George III’s birthday, ended in just minutes, with 15 soldiers dead and commanding officer Captain George Etherington held prisoner. The loss of Michilimackinac was undoubtedly the low point of Etherington’s life, but this resourceful officer ultimately enjoyed a long career in the British military. (more…)

Mackinac’s Contribution to Fashion? Hats!

Mackinac’s Contribution to Fashion? Hats!

Nearly all European and American men wore felt hats in the 18th century. Hats came in numerous shapes and sizes, as seen in this 1747 engraving by famed illustrator William Hogarth.

Nearly all European and American men wore felt hats in the 18th century. Hats came in numerous shapes and sizes, as seen in this 1747 engraving by famed illustrator William Hogarth.

For over 200 years, Michilimackinac, and later Mackinac Island, were centers of the Great Lakes fur trade. Every summer, merchants based at Michilimackinac or on the island shipped tons of furs to factories on the Atlantic coast or in Europe. Trapped by indigenous people around the Great Lakes, otter, muskrat, mink, rabbit, fox, and especially beaver pelts were highly prized in the garment and fashion industry. These furs were used to trim collars and cuffs, line capes and muffs, and, most importantly, to make felt hats. (more…)