WPA and Mackinac

WPA and Mackinac

The Works Progress Administration (WPA) was a New Deal work program established in 1935 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. It provided skill-based jobs to unemployed Americans affected by the Great Depression. Through the WPA over 650,000 miles of roads, 75,000 bridges, and 8,000 parks were built. (more…)

Archaeology Update

Archaeology Update

MSHP staff member Alex excavating in the root cellar.

MSHP staff member Alex excavating in the root cellar.

We have reached the halfway point of the 2017 Michilimackinac archaeology field season. We have known since the project began that this was a fur trader’s house, and the numerous trade artifacts recovered this summer confirm that. We have found over a dozen gunflints, four trade gun caliber musket balls, several fishhooks, fragments from two Jesuit rings and glass beads in many colors and sizes. These have mostly come from the interior of the house. (more…)

Mr. Michilimackinac: Jim Evans’ 47 Years

Mr. Michilimackinac: Jim Evans’ 47 Years

Jim Evans 6Jim Evans isn’t a stranger to attention.

Entering his 47th season as a historical interpreter at Colonial Michilimackinac, Jim is a fan-favorite among visitors and employees alike. However, Jim is known for his soft-spoken, friendly demeanor and isn’t one to boast about his accomplishments. A native of Mackinaw City, Jim has always been fascinated by his hometown’s rich history. (more…)

1815: The Americans Return to Mackinac Island

1815: The Americans Return to Mackinac Island

On July 18, 1815, Mackinac Island once again became part of the United States after three years of British occupation during the War of 1812. The war brought many changes to the island, including the construction of a second fort on the heights of Mackinac. This weekend, this small post, Fort Holmes, will come to life to tell the story of Mackinac Island during the early years of peace.  IMG_3751 (more…)

Confederate Political Prisoners at Fort Mackinac

Confederate Political Prisoners at Fort Mackinac

Washington Barrow (1807-1866) Congressman, Newspaper editor, Attorney General of Tennessee

Washington Barrow (1807-1866)
Congressman, Newspaper editor, Attorney General of Tennessee

During the summer of 1862, Mackinac Island became the home to three men from Tennessee who refused to swear allegiance to the Union. In April, military Governor Andrew Johnson had the three men arrested for their support of the Confederacy and “treasonous inclinations.” Johnson felt that the wealthy, planter class of the South was part of the reason for the war and he wanted the three men removed from Tennessee. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton ordered the three men sent to Detroit until a decision could be made regarding their incarceration.

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What’s Missing at Old Mackinac Point?

What’s Missing at Old Mackinac Point?

When you visit the Old Mackinac Point Light Station today, you are stepping back in time to the early years of the 20th century. Since 2004, Mackinac State Historic Parks has been working to return the station grounds to their appearance just over 100 years ago. Three original buildings- the 1892 keepers’ quarters and tower, the 1906 fog signal building, and the 1892 barn- have all been restored to their original appearance, while the 1890 warehouse was reconstructed to match the original in 2014. The station looks complete, but there are still a few elements missing.

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From the Archives

From the Archives

Hotel Labels

Mackinac Island baggage labels from the 1940s.

As Mackinac Island gears up for another season and hotels begin to reopen, we look back at how earlier travelers documented their vacations. Gum-backed stickers for a suitcase announced to the world how well traveled you were. Two of these unused Mackinac examples also served as ads for the Chippewa Hotel, established in 1902. The far right one dates to 1947, when This Time for Keeps was released. The M-G-M musical included scenes filmed on the island. Continue into this post for a few historic images of Mackinac Island hotels still welcoming guests.

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